We have honored TV celebrities in the past.  This episode, we pay tribute to an icon from the 80s and 90s, Larry "Bud" Melman.  Not only was he a comic foil on Letterman's shows, he had bit parts in other TV shows and movies, he was a writer, he was a spokesman, and he even had his own workout video...sort of.  Grab your Toast on a Stick and enjoy this installment of It Was a Thing on TV.

1995 was a tough time for baseball, in the middle of a strike and using replacement players in spring training.  Andy Richter lightened the mood by visiting the Mets in Port St. Lucie, FL, interviewing replacement players, informing people about the real St. Lucie, and visiting Butterfly World.

Also, we meet, the man, the myth, the legend, DIESEL!

Our tribute to Conan O'Brien continues with his rough and all too brief era hosting The Tonight Show back in 2009. We look at some of the memorible moments of this era of Conan from the Twitter Tracker to Shatner recites Palin to In The Year 3000.

All in all, Jeff Zucker did Conan real dirty, all because of a certain Mr. Black (Not THAT one, the OTHER one). You all know who we're talking about.

In 1997, Conan O'Brien had an audience of just kids.  What kind of mayhem could happen?  Just don't end up in Naughty Land and don't awaken the Boredom Monster.

Complete episode on YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFHKnq5MQb0

Over two years, The Morton Downey Jr. Show took the nation by storm.  It was all over by Fall 1989, maybe because it was too controversial but also because the new late night show on the block at the time also took the nation by storm, The Arsenio Hall Show.

Who doesn't enjoy late night television's comedy bits between the monologue and the first guest?  We like them so much, we are devoting episodes to such segments which we affectionately call "shows within the show."  Our first look at late night shows within the show is David Letterman, running the gamut from a troubled teen who is clearly not a troubled teen, to a spoof of one of the most popular and controversial shows of the day.

In 1986, Bruce Forsyth wasn't the only UK entertainer to be imported by ABC.  For one week, UK legend Noel Edmonds had his own self-titled talk show following Nightline.  Even throwing out a gaggle of superstar guests didn't get the show a longer run.

This week 40 years ago saw the temporary ends of three game shows, each of which would return to TV by 1987.  That week also saw the birth of a legend, though he made his mark in late night.  We look at the three NBC game show finales of June 20, 1980 and their replacement, The David Letterman Show in this timely installment of the podcast.

What was Greg's dive down a rabbit hole after recording a few months ago became this very experimental episode.  The Maury staff sure comes up with different ways to describe their DNA and lie detector shows.

We talk about the ultimate spoof of daytime talk shows, Night Stand with Dick Dietrick.  Topics in this show include successes (and a failure) which came for most of the people behind Night Stand, the time there was an accidental wardrobe malfunction, and what happened when Mike wrote an e-mail to the show.

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